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Air Marshal Sir Raymund Hart (22211)


Raymund George          b: 28 Feb 1899                      r: xx xxx xxxx                                   d: 16 Jul 1960

KBE 13 Jun 1957 (CBE 8 Jun 1944; OBE 11 Jul 1940), CB 13 Jun 1946, MC 26 Jul 1918, MiD 24 Sep 1941, MiD 14 Jan 1944, MiD 1 Jan 1945, MIEE, ARCS.

(Army): - 2Lt (P): 24 May 1917, 2Lt: 4 Dec 1917.

(RAF): - (T) Lt: 1 Apr 1918, Fg Off: xx xxx xxxx, Flt Lt: 14 May 1930, Sqn Ldr: 1 Oct 1936, (T) Wg Cdr: 1 Jan 1940, (T) Gp Capt: 1 Dec 1941, Wg Cdr: 14 Apr 1942 [1 Jan 1940], Act A/Cdre: 27 May 1943, Gp Capt (WS): 27 Nov 1943, (T) A/Cdre: 1 Dec 1943, Gp Capt: 1 Dec 1944, Act AVM: 16 Aug 1945 27 Feb 1946, 15 Feb 1949, A/Cdre: 1 Jul 1947, AVM: 1 Jan 1953, Act AM: 3 Oct 1956, AM: 1 Jan 1957.

(RAFO): - Fg Off (P): 9 Dec 1924, Fg Off: 9 Jun 1925,

xx xxx xxxx:                  Cadet, RFC

24 May 1917:              Appointed to a Commission on the General List (RFC).

 4 Dec 1917:                Flying Officer, RFC

14 Feb 1919:               Transferred to the Unemployed List.

 9 Dec 1924:                Appointed to a Commission in the General Duties Branch of the RAFO (Class A)

 2 Jul 1926:                  Pilot, No 24 Sqn.

 6 Dec 1927:                Attended Electrical and Wireless School.

19 Nov 1928:               Attended Course in W/T , L'Ecole Superieure D'Electricitie, Paris

 7 Mar 1930:               Signals Officer, No 28 Sqn.

 5 Feb 1932:                Signals Staff Officer, HQ RAF India.

 3 Apr 1933:                Flight Commander, No 5 Sqn.

xx xxx xxxx:                  Attended Interpreters Course

xx xxx xxxx:                  Supernumerary?

22 Jan 1934:                Attended RAF Staff College.

21 Dec 1934:               Flight Commander, No 9 Sqn.

 1 May 1936:               Signals Officer, HQ No 11 (Fighter) Group.

12 Oct 1937:                Signals Officer, HQ Fighter Command             

16 Feb 1941:               Deputy Director of Radio.

xx xxx 1942:                 Deputy Director RDF.

24 Apr 1940:               Transferred to the Technical Branch.

25 Dec 1943:               Signals Officer, HQ Fighter Command

27 May 1943:              Command Signals Officer, HQ Fighter Command

15 Nov 1943:               Command Signals Officer, HQ Air Defence of Great Britain

xx xxx 1945:                 Chief Signals Officer, Allied Control Commission

1 Apr 1946:                 AOC, No 27 (Training) Group.

xx xxx 1947:                 ?

xx Jan 1948:                 Director of Technical Services (Policy)/Technical Policy

15 Feb 1949:               AOC, No 90 (Signals) Group

 1 Apr 1951:                Director-General of Engineering.

 1 Apr 1955:                AOC, No 41 Group.

 3 Oct 1956:                 Controller of Engineering and Equipment.

He was largely responsible for developing the organisation and details of the Filter Room, which was one of the major links in the early warning chain that proved to be so successful in the Battle of Britain.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

T./Lt. Ramund George Hart, R.A.F. (note incorrect spelling of first name)

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, when on patrol, his machine, of which he was the pilot, was attacked from below by four hostile scouts.  Though he himself was wounded, and his machine seriously damaged by the first burst of fire from the enemy machines, he continued to manoeuvre his machine so skilfully that his observer was able to send down in flames the nearest hostile scout and to drive down out of control a second enemy machine.  Despite the fact that one enemy plane continued to attack him, he succeeded in landing his machine. The destruction of these two hostile machines was in a great degree due to his gallantry and determination in manoeuvring his machine when almost out of control.

(London Gazette 26 July 1918)

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